Download National Braai Day song

Link to Download National Braai Day song

Free download of the song by Heuwels, JR, HHP and Soweto Gospel Choir

How to braai the perfect steak

Link to How to braai the perfect steak

Comprehensive step by step instruction and recipe on how to braai perfect steak – by Jan Braai.

What is Chisa Nyama?

Link to What is Chisa Nyama?

What is Chisa Nyama? What is Chesa Nyama? What is Shisa Nyama?

Pulled Pork Potjie

JBVE6_EP02_IMG_023The concept of pulled pork is very simple. We start with a very cheap cut of meat that is fairly tough. The meat is generously spiced until it has real attitude and we then slow-cook it in a potjie until it’s so soft we can just pull it apart. Pulled pork is not really a meal for two. The size of the meat and time it takes to prepare means that when it’s pulled pork, it’s a party! This recipe is incredibly easy, especially if you follow it. Phone you butcher ahead of time and ask him to prepare a 2 kg piece of deboned pork shoulder. For a competent butcher this is a piece of cake and it’s not a particularly expensive cut of meat either. Failing this, 2 kg of pork shoulder on the bone will work just as well. Supermarkets generally sell pieces of pork meat of roughly this size. Your weapon of choice here is a no. 2 or no. 3 three-legged potjie or a no. 10 flat-bottomed one. You make the dressing sauce ahead of time and you’ll also do most of the work for the pork a few hours in advance. By the time your party guests arrive, all you need to do is occasionally add a few coals under the potjie and of course, serve up a great meal.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 10)

TO PREPARE THE MEAT

  • 2 kg pork shoulder (or other piece of pork meat)
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp mustard powder
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tot paprika
  • 1 tot brown sugar

FOR THE POTJIE

  • 1 tot olive oil
  • 1 onion (sliced)
  • 4 garlic cloves (crushed)
  • 3 cups liquid (see step 6)

FOR THE RANCH SAUCE

  • 1 bottle buttermilk (2 cups)
  • 1 tub sour cream
  • 3 tots chives (freshly chopped)
  • 1 tot Dijon mustard
  • 1 lemon (juice and zest)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper

WHAT TO DO

  1. To make the sauce you shake the bottle of buttermilk before opening its top. Now throw that and all the other ingredients for the sauce in a bowl or jug and mix well. Cover whatever the sauce is in and put in in your fridge until you’re ready to serve the meal.
  2. Prepare the meat by mixing all the spices together then rub the spice blend into the pork shoulder.
  3. Get some flames under the potjie, add the oil and onion, and fry the onion for a few minutes.
  4. Now add the garlic and the whole chunk of pork to the potjie.
  5. Brown the pork shoulder on all sides. You can take as long as you like to do this but aim for 10 minutes.
  6. Your cooking liquid should be 3 cups in total – 2 cups of chicken stock and 1 cup of beer, cider, white wine, red wine, apple juice or ginger ale. Add all 3 cups to the potjie and let the potjie heat up to a gentle simmer. Now close the lid. The potjie should bubble very slowly for 3 to 4 hours until the meat is very soft and starts to fall apart by itself. Every half hour or so you can lift the lid and flip the meat over. If at any time the potjie is running dry, add a bit more cooking liquid, using any of the options.
  7. When the pork is done, remove from the fire and let it rest somewhere to relax a bit. Use two forks to pull apart and shred the pork. Taste a piece and congratulate yourself. Now mix all the pulled pork with all the remaining liquid in the potjie.
  8. Your guests can build their own creations by piling a generous helping of pulled pork meat onto a roll, and topping it with ranch sauce, slices of gherkin and slices of onion.

AND…

Make the rolls with 10 soft burger rolls, 4 big gherkins (sliced into thin strips with a vegetable peeler), and 1 red onion (thinly sliced).

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Enter the National Braai Tour 2016

entry photo 2After the success and global appeal of the 2014 and 2015 versions of the National Braai Tour, we are very excited and looking forward to 2016. Our simple aim is to take a group of proud and passionate South Africans (mostly) on a weeklong tour through beautiful parts of South Africa. During this week participants will join us to visit significant and interesting heritage sites, we’ll unite around fires, braai a few times per day and wave the South African flag.
There is a huge public demand for entries and participation in the tour and we literally have had 100’s of email and social media requests over the past few months from interested parties. The 2016 tour will feature 40 teams (as opposed to the 60 teams we had in 2015) thus space is limited and we will unfortunately not be able to accommodate all interested parties, both old and new. Please take your time to complete the application form and provide us with as much information as you can in order to increase your chances of a successful team entry.
If you need to know every minute detail of the tour before being able to enter, you’re probably not the right person for this adventure. Below however are the things we can share with you at this stage. If this looks like your cup of beer, complete the application form and good luck!

Saturday 10 September 2016 – Saturday 17 September 2016.

The tour will start in Cape Town on Saturday 10 September 2016.
The rest of route will be in South Africa. There will be reasonable distances of driving per day (our aim is 2 – 3 hours) and picturesque landscapes. The tour will finish somewhere in South Africa from where you can then make your own way back to anywhere else in the country in one day. If you need more specific information before you are willing to make the commitment to enter, you are probably not the right person to take part in the National Braai Tour. We might share the rest of the route with you later, we might keep it secret until the start of the actual tour.

You can only enter as a team of four.

Entry fee is R20 000 per team of four and needs to be paid in full to reserve your entry. Each team member change requested after confirmation of a successful entry will be charged at R2,500 admin fee per change. If for some reason your team cannot take part anymore and pull out after successfully entering, we will replace it with a team on our waiting list and it will be dealt with as 4 team member changes and you will receive a R10,000 refund [20,000 – (4 x 2,500)]. The last day for any such changes will be 1 June 2016.

Entry fee includes:

  • Camping fees and entrance fees
  • 2 Meals per day (usually breakfast and dinner, sometimes lunch)
  • Braai gear (grids, tongs, potjies) – you keep this after the tour
  • Wood and firelighters
  • Utensils (knives, bowls, crockery and cutlery) – you keep this after the tour
  • #braaitour goods which all your non #braaitour friends will be jealous of (e.g. caps, shirts, hoodies, vehicle stickers) – you keep this after the tour
  • One proper South African flag per person
  • Various other freebies and gifts
  • All alcoholic drinks and soft drinks at the bar when the bar is open. We serve all the classics you expect to see at a braai. We do not serve French champagne and we do not serve papsak. We serve normal high quality South African alcohol and it’s included for free.

Our aim to to organise a tour where you only need to bring yourself, clothes and toiletries. In addition you as a team need your own vehicle, tent(s), mattresses and sleeping bags and pay for your own fuel and toll fees. Broadly speaking, we are providing everything else.

One vehicle per team

This is slightly different from past years so please read with care. Due to the pressure on the infrastructure of the beautiful heritage sites we visit during the tour, teams of four are limited to one vehicle per four persons. We think this means you as a team can spend more quality time together and will logically also save fuel and toll fees.

How the application and entry process works:

  • Your team completes an application to enter (the form below).
  • Please bear in mind that there are a vast number of applications that we need to review and you might not get any feedback from us for a few weeks.
  • Successful applicants are notified via email and we provide them with banking details. Once this R20,000 entry fee is paid that team’s entry to the 2016 National Braai Tour is official.

 

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‘Jan Braai vir Erfenis’ theme song

JanBraaivirErfenisLogoAfter thousands of requests, here it is and available for free download, the ‘Jan Braai vir Erfenis’ theme song! All copyright is reserved and this song is made available for private non-commercial use. Please note that this song is only available in this format and length. There is no longer or full version. This is the full length.

Na duisende versoeke, hier is hy nou beskikbaar om verniet af te laai. Alle regte word behou en die tema lied van Jan Braai vir Erfenis kan hier afgelaai word vir private en persoonlike gebruik. Let daarop dat die lied net beskikbaar is in hierdie formaat en lengte. Daar is geen langer weergawe nie. Hierdie is die oorspronklike en enigste weergawe. 

JanBraai Theme Song (Left click to play, right click to save link and download the song)

 

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Irish Soda Bread

JanBraai Irish Soda BreadFrom an effort point of view, there are three types of bread: flatbread, bread made with yeast, and bread made with baking soda. Flatbread types use no raising agent whatsoever and are consequently flat like roti. Then there is yeasted bread that uses some form of yeast to make it rise. To activate this yeast takes time and you need to knead the dough. Our third bread category uses baking soda to create bubbles in the dough to make it rise. Unlike yeast, baking soda does not need to be kneaded to do its work. In fact, many expert bakers agree that when using baking soda, not only should you knead the dough as little as possible, you should actually not knead it at all! I know what you’re thinking and yes, this is super fantastic news.

The baking soda needs something to react with and we will use buttermilk for that something, as it will also add some taste to the bread. Although you can quite successfully bake a lily-white soda bread, I prefer the taste and coarse texture of wholewheat and oats. When you’re travelling the backroads and get hold of a truly great jar of jam at a farm stall or market, this is the bread it deserves.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 6–8)

  • butter (for oiling the potjie)
  • 3 cups Nutty Wheat flour (or wholewheat flour)
  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 bottle buttermilk (2 cups)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Smear the inside of your no. 10 flat-bottomed baking potjie generously with butter.
  2. Put all the ingredients, except for the buttermilk, into a mixing bowl and mix well.
  3. Now add the buttermilk and stir with a wooden spoon until everything is combined. Remember, not only is it unnecessary to knead the dough, it is better not to. So as soon as everything is properly mixed you are good to go.
  4. Flop the dough into the prepared potjie, dust the top of the bread with some extra flour (this is purely for cosmetic purposes) and use your favourite and sharpest pocket knife to cut a cross in the top of the bread. As with the flour dusting, this cross is only for cosmetic purposes and makes no real contribution to the taste of the end product. (But we all know good-looking food tastes better.)
  5. Now close the lid and bake for about 45 minutes until done. You want some coals under the potjie and some coals on the lid. When any particular coal loses motivation, discard it and replace with a new one. There is no particular risk in baking the bread too slowly but if you rush it, it might burn so rather err on the side of caution.
  6. After 45 minutes, remove the lid taking care not to spill too much ash onto the bread. A bit of ash is fine, again, for cosmetic purposes. Insert the tip of a knife into the bread and if it comes out clean, the bread is ready.
  7. If the bread does not stick to the potjie at all and comes out whole, great. If it sticks to the bottom of the potjie a bit, don’t worry. Take a spatula, go in on the lines of the cross you cut earlier and take it out in quarters.

AND…

This recipe works with any combination of 4 cups of flour. You could drop the oats and go with just 4 cups of Nutty Wheat or wholewheat flour. Or use 2 cups of Nutty Wheat and 2 cups of normal white flour. You get my drift.

Posted in Recipes, Vegetarian | 2 Comments

Ierse Soda Brood

JanBraai Irish Soda BreadWat moeite betref, is daar drie tipes brood: platbrood, brood wat met gis gemaak is, en brood wat met koeksoda gemaak is. Platbrood gebruik hoegenaamd geen rysmiddel nie en is daarom plat; byvoorbeeld ‘n Indiese roti. Dan is daar gegiste brood wat gis in die een of ander vorm gebruik om dit te laat rys. Om die gis aan die gang te kry kan ’n tydjie neem en jy moet die deeg knie. Ons derde broodkategorie gebruik koeksoda om borrels in die deeg te maak sodat dit kan rys. Anders as met gis, is dit nie met koeksoda nodig om die deeg te knie om sy werk gedoen te kry nie. Om die waarheid te sê, die meeste bobaas-bakkers stem saam dat wanneer jy koeksoda gebruik, jy nie net die deeg so min as moontlik hoef te knie nie, jy moet dit eintlik glad nie knie nie! Ek weet wat jy dink, en ja, dis superfantastiese nuus.

Die koeksoda het iets nodig om mee te reageer en in hierdie geval is karringmelk daardie iets, want dit sal ook die brood ’n bietjie smaak gee. Al kan jy met sukses ’n leliewit-sodabrood bak, verkies ek die smaak en growwe tekstuur van volgraan en hawermout. Wanneer jy met die agterpaaie reis en jy kom by ’n plaasstal of mark op ’n regte lekker fles konfyt af, is hierdie die brood wat hy verdien.

This recipe is also available in English here.

WAT JY NODIG HET (vir 6–8 mense)

  • botter (om die pot mee te olie)
  • 3 koppies Nutty Wheat (of volgraanmeel)
  • 1 koppie hawermout
  • 1 teelepel koeksoda
  • 1 teelepel sout
  • 1 bottel karringmelk (2 koppies)
  • jou nommer 10-platboompotjie

LAAT WAAI!

  1. Smeer die binnekant van jou nommer 10-platboompotjie rojaal met botter.
  2. Gooi al die bestanddele, behalwe die karringmelk, in ’n bak en meng deeglik.
  3. Nou gooi jy die karringmelk by en roer met ’n houtlepel totdat alles gemeng is. Onthou, dis nie net onnodig om die deeg te knie nie, dis beter om dit oor te slaan. Sodra alles ordentlik gemeng is, is jy reg om aan te gaan.
  4. Smeer die binnekant van jou nommer 10-platboompotjie met genoeg botter. Dop die deeg in die geoliede potjie uit, strooi ’n bietjie ekstra meel bo-oor (dis net vir die mooiheid) en gebruik jou gunsteling- en skerpste knipmes om ’n kruis bo-op die brood te sny. Soos met die meelstrooiery, is die kruis net vir die mooi en maak nie regtig ’n bydrae tot die smaak van die eindproduk nie. (Maar ons almal weet dat kos wat goed lyk, beter smaak.)
  5. Sit nou die deksel op en bak vir omtrent 45 minute tot gaar. Jy wil ’n klompie kole onder die potjie hê en ’n klompie op die deksel. Wanneer ’n kool moeg is, raak ontslae van hom en vervang met ’n wakker een. Daar is nie ’n besondere risiko daaraan om die brood te stadig te bak nie, maar as jy dit afjaag, kan hy brand, so wees eerder rustig.
  6. Ná 45 minute, haal die deksel af en pasop dat jy nie te veel as op die brood mors nie. Steek die punt van ’n mes in die brood en as hy skoon is wanneer jy hom uittrek, is die brood reg.
  7. As die brood glad nie in die potjie vassit nie en in een stuk uitkom, mooi so. As hy effe aan die bodem van die potjie klou, moenie bekommer nie. Vat ’n spatel en druk hom in op die lyne wat jy vroeër in die brood gesny het en haal hom in kwarte uit.

EN…

Die resep werk met enige kombinasie van 4 koppies meel. Jy kan die hawermout uitlos en net die 4 koppies Nutty Wheat of volgraanmeel gebruik. Of gebruik 2 koppies Nutty Wheat en 2 koppies gewone wit meel. Jy weet wat ek bedoel.

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