Beef Recipes

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Rump Steak Shawarma

JanBraai Steak ShawarmaDöner also known elsewhere in the world as shawarma, kebab or pita bread is the most popular street food in the German capital city Berlin. It consists of a flat pita bread filled with various trimmings but the main and star ingredient is meat cooked on a vertical rotisserie. The seasoned meat stacked in the shape of an inverted cone is turned slowly on the rotisserie, next to a vertical cooking element. The outer layer is sliced vertically into thin shavings as it cooks. Well, that is how they generally do it in Berlin anyhow. BUT: There is an easier way to make your own, that will  be quicker, look cooler and also taste better. And that my friends is of course is that we braai the rump steak instead of it dancing on a pole all day. You still get the same flavours but only more, because have have the additional world class flavour of the braai!

WHAT YOU NEED: (Feeds 4)

  • 2 carrots
  • 2 small baby cabbages or 2 quarters from big ones (Use 1 green and 1 red)
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tot brown sugar
  • ½ cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon whole cumin seeds
  • 1 sprig of fresh thyme
  • ½ cucumber
  • 2 sweet red pepper, red and yellow, thinly sliced,
  • Hummus
  • Full cream yogurt
  • Pita Bread
  • Rump Steak

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Use your grater to grate the cabbage and carrots together in a bowl. Add the thinly sliced onion. Pour the sugar, salt, vinegar, cumin seeds and thyme into the bowl and mix well. Let this mixture sit aside and start to pickle as you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Slice the red pepper, yellow pepper, radishes and cucumber into thin slices and keep them aside, ready to use when you assemble the pita.
  3. Prepare your steak by salting your steaks with coarse sea salt. Do not panic that this will be too salty, most of the salt will fall off during the braai.
  4. Braai your steak over hot coals for 8 minutes until medium rare. Feel free to add some extra spice to your steak, when the craving speaks to me I just use a bottle of peri peri sauce that’s in the kitchen. Let the steak rest for a few minutes and then carve it into very thin slivers at a 45° angle.
  5. Give the pitas some time on the coals and toast them lightly before you start to assemble your meal.
  6. Now build your shawarma: Halve the toasted pitas and spread with a layer of hummus on the inside. Add a bit of the pickled salad and the rest of the salad ingredients. Top it off with slices of rump steak and finish it with some yogurt on top.

THE GARLIC BURGER CHARTER

knoffelburgerWith this burger we are not going to beat about the garlic plantation. It is our explicit intention to have the recognisable flavour of garlic ever present. Let’s clear something up – there is no such thing as ‘breath that stinks of garlic’. What these counter-garlic revolutionaries are actually trying to say is ‘you carry the pleasant smell of garlic, I am jealous of the great meal you had’. Garlic is very healthy for you and has been used by humans to flavour food for over 7 000 years. If you have friends who frown upon the abundant culinary use of garlic, my suggestion is that you simply cut them from your circle of trust. Alternatively, give them a fair warning not to attend your garlic burger braai!

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 4)
FOR THE BURGERS

  • 1 kg beef mince
  • 4 hamburger rolls
  • 1 roll or slab of garlic and herb butter
  • 1 tot olive oil
  • salt and pepper (freshly ground)
  • salad leaves
  • 2 tomatoes (sliced)

FOR THE SAUCE

  • 1 tot butter
  • 6 garlic cloves (crushed and finely chopped – this is enough if the cloves are a decent size; otherwise use more because you want the sauce to have a strong taste of garlic)
  • 1 tot flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup cream
  • 1 cup cheese (aged white Cheddar, grated)
  • 1 tsp salt

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Make the patties: Cut four disks of about 1 cm thick from the roll or slab of garlic butter. Use your wet hands, recently washed with soap and then rinsed with cold water, to divide the mince into 4 evenly sized balls and then form the patties around the disks of butter. The idea is to have firm patties with the butter disks at the centre. In practice you put a disk of butter on a ball of mince, push it right to the middle of the mince with one of your thumbs and then form the patty around it. To flatten and neaten them I like to put them on a flat surface, press down on the patty with the palm of one hand and pat them all around the side with the other hand. Put the patties on a plate and refrigerate until you’re ready to braai them.
  2. Make the creamy garlic sauce: Melt the butter in a pot and add the garlic. Let the garlic fry for about 30 seconds and then add the flour and mix well. Add a little bit of milk at a time and stir continuously. Keep on adding the milk and once it is all in, gradually add the cream and stir until all of that is in as well. Now let the mixture simmer for a few minutes. Add the cheese, stir that in and season to taste with salt. You could theoretically perform this step while you braai the patties but I like to do it beforehand and then to reheat and wake up the sauce just as it’s about to be served.
  3. Braai the patties: The biggest challenge is keeping the patties in one piece by ensuring that they don’t stick to the grid. Put the patties down very gently, do not press on them, do not handle them any more than is necessary, and when you turn them do it with extreme care. Start on very high heat to seal them quickly, hopefully before they have the chance to ‘sink’ into the grid and get stuck. Braai the patty for about 8 to 10 minutes in total. Once on each side will do the trick so you will need to turn them only once. Don’t fiddle with the patties to check whether they are sticking. As the meat starts to cook, it releases fat and juices and usually loosens itself from the grid. If you always have a big problem with patties sticking to the grid then brush them with oil on both sides before the braai.
  4. For bonus points: If you have the time and enough space on your braai grid, toast the insides of the rolls after you’ve buttered them during the final stages of your braai.
  5. Assemble your burgers: Place lettuce and tomato at the bottom of the bun, followed by your braaied garlic-stuffed patty and a generous helping of the creamy garlic and cheese sauce. Finish with salt and pepper.

BACON, PINEAPPLE AND SWEET CHILLI BURGER

JanBraai Sweet Chilli Bacon Pineapple and Cheese BurgerThis recipe started out life when my parents had a particularly large crop of chillies in their herb garden. You can only use that many chillies in your curry potjies and so we decided to try and make sweet chilli sauce with some of the red devils. Practice makes perfect and before long there was the sweet chilli sauce recipe below, which as you will see once you make it, is very good! I feel that a properly braaied beef burger is the perfect vehicle to carry this sauce to your mouth, and that braaied bacon and pineapple are the best fellow passengers it could possibly wish for.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 4)

FOR THE SWEET CHILLI SAUCE

  • 5 chillies (any type or a combination, with a few extra on standby)
  • 2 cloves garlic (crushed or chopped)
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar (or rice vinegar or white grape vinegar)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tot cornflour mixed with 1/2 tot water

FOR THE BURGER

  • 1 kg beef mince (buy steak and mince at home or ask your butcher)
  • 4 hamburger rolls
  • salt and pepper (freshly ground)
  • 1 packet streaky bacon (250 g)
  • 1 pineapple (peeled and sliced into rings)
  • butter (for the rolls)
  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese (grated)
  • salad leaves tomato (sliced)

WHAT TO DO

MAKE THE SWEET CHILLI SAUCE

  1. Chop the chillies finely. If you don’t want too much burn in the sauce, remove some or all of the seeds. If you like it hot, leave the seeds in. If you think the chillies you have are quite mild, use more than 5 chillies. If you think the chillies you have are particularly potent, use your common sense and good luck!
  2. Throw the chopped chillies, garlic, vinegar, water, sugar, salt and soy sauce into a small flameproof pan or potjie, then stir well and bring to a simmer over some coals or a few flames. Naturally this can also be done on a stove.
  3. Simmer for about 6 minutes, until the sugar has dissolved completely; the exact time will obviously depend on your coals or flames.
  4. Mix the half tot of cornflour with a half tot of water in a suitable cup, glass or mug. Add the cornflour mixture to the sauce and stir until the sauce gets thicker. This will take about 1 minute.
  5. The sauce is now ready. Remove from the fire, let it cool slightly while you braai the meat and then serve.

MAKE THE BURGER

  1. Form the mince into 4 evenly sized patties with your hands and flatten out.
  2. When you braai the patties, the biggest challenge is keeping them in one piece. Put them down very gently on the grid, do not press on them, do not handle them any more than is necessary, and turn them with extreme care. Start on very high heat to seal them quickly, hopefully before they have the chance to ‘sink’ into the grid. Braai for about 8 minutes in total. Once on each side during that time is enough. As the meat starts to cook it releases fat and juices and usually loosens itself from the grid. Season the patties with a grind of salt and pepper while they are braaing.
  3. While the patties are braaing, also place the bacon on your grid and braai until crispy. Also braai the pineapple slices for 5 minutes on each side so that they caramelise and sweeten.
  4. As the elements on the grid become ready, remove and use that empty space on the braai grid to toast the insides of the rolls after you’ve buttered them.
  5. Assemble the burger with your freshly homemade sweet chilli sauce as the crowing glory.

Bobotie Potjie

janbraai bobotieBobotie is a South African classic and an important part of our culinary heritage. It’s also one of my favourite meals, but this doesn’t make me special: everybody loves bobotie. As with many other South African cult hits, you can cook it very successfully in a potjie on a braai fire. I believe it’s your moral duty to perfect the art of making bobotie. It’s a great way to show off when you cook for visitors to South Africa.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 6)

  • 1 tot oil
  • 3 onions (finely chopped)
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 tots medium strength curry powder
  • 1/2 tot ground turmeric
  • 1 kg beef mince, ostrich mince or venison mince
  • 1/2 tot salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup apricot jam
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup almond flakes
  • 1 tot vinegar (or lemon juice)
  • 5 bay leaves
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • rice (to serve)
  • chutney (to serve)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Heat the oil in a flat-bottomed potjie over a medium-hot fire and fry the onions and garlic until the onions are soft but not brown.
  2. Add the curry powder and turmeric, then fry for a minute – the bottom of the potjie will look quite dry, but don’t let the mixture burn.
  3. Chuck in the mince and fry for about 10 minutes, stirring it to break up any lumps with a wooden spoon. The mince should change colour from red to light brown, but shouldn’t turn dark yet. The meat should release some juices – use these juices and your wooden spoon to loosen any sticky bits on the bottom of the potjie.
  4. Add the salt and pepper, apricot jam, raisins, almond flakes and vinegar/lemon juice. Stir well, bring to a slow simmer and put on the lid. Simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring once in a while to make sure the mixture doesn’t burn.
  5. Now remove the lid and flatten the mixture with the back of your spoon so that it’s even across the bottom of the potjie. Whisk the eggs and milk together in a small mixing bowl, then pour over the bobotie. Stick the bay leaves into the egg mixture. Cover with the lid and put a layer of hot coals on top of the lid. At this stage you only want coals on the lid, not underneath the potjie. Cook for 30 minutes and the bobotie should be ready.
  6. Serve with rice and chutney on the side.

AND …

You might like to serve sliced banana, coconut or chopped tomatoes with the bobotie.

BLOODY MARY BURGER

Bloody Mary BurgerMillions of people around the world enjoy the combination of ingredients that makes up the Bloody Mary cocktail. As you know, every single one of those ingredients also goes well with a pure 100% beef patty that was braaied on the coals of a wood fire. This brings us to our next magic trick; we’re making a hot sauce based on the classic cocktail and serving it with braaied burgers.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 4)

  • 1 tot olive oil
  • 1 red onion (chopped)
  • 1 red pepper (sliced or chopped)
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tin tomato cocktail juice (200 ml)
  • 1?2 tot Worcestershire sauce
  • 1?2 tot Tabasco sauce
  • 1 lemon (juice)
  • salt and black pepper
  • 1 kg beef mince
  • 4 hamburger rolls butter
  • fresh lettuce leaves
  • 4 celery sticks (for garnishing)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Heat the oil in your fireproof pan and fry the onion and red pepper until soft. Add the paprika and fry for another minute.
  2. Add the tomato cocktail juice, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce and juice of the lemon, and let it simmer for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside.
  3. 100% beef mince patties do not need any binding agents like egg or bread crumbs. You just need to braai them like a pro. Start by shaping the mince into 4 evenly sized patties with your hands. If you’re doing this ahead of time, put them on a flat even surface like a plate and keep in the fridge until you braai them. Get the thickness equal all round – we’re not making meatballs remember, and they should not look oval with a hump in the middle when you look at them from the side.
  4. Braai the patties with care. The only way the patties will break apart is if you break them apart. This happens if they stick to the grid, sink into the grid or you turn them all the time – so don’t let any of these things happen. Put the patties down very gently on the grid and do not press on them. The patties are 100% steak so braai them exactly as you would a whole steak of the same size. Braai them on very high heat to seal them quickly before they have the chance to ‘sink’ into the grid. They should spend about 8 to 10 minutes in total over the coals. Once on each side during that time is enough, and twice on each side is the maximum. Don’t fiddle with the patties to check whether they are sticking. As the meat starts to cook it will release fat and juices and usually loosen itself from the grid.
  5. During the final stages of the braai, toast the insides of the buttered rolls.
  6. Assemble the burger, starting with the lettuce on the roll at the bottom followed by the patty. Divide the sauce among the 4 burgers. Add some extra freshly ground pepper and the top half of the roll. Garnish by skewering the burgers with a celery stick, which will not only look cool, but also hold it all together. Serve with additional Tabasco sauce. Cheers!

Beef Wellington

Jan Braai Beef WellingtonEverything tastes better on the braai, in this case it’s the classic Beef Wellington.

What you need:

  • 1 tot olive oil
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 250g mushrooms (finely chopped)
  • 1 cup (250ml) cream
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 300 – 500 g steak (rump, sirloin, fillet)
  • 400 roll of puff pastry
  • grated cheese (optional)
  • smoked ham (optional)

What to do:

  1. Finely chop the onion and mushrooms. Add olive oil and/or butter and the finely chopped onion and mushrooms to a pan and fry until the mushrooms lose their moisture and starts to brown. Then add the thyme.
  2. Add some or all of the cream to the pan and let this mushroom, onion and cream sauce reduce to a fairly thick paste.
  3. Trim the steak of your choice (rump, sirloin or fillet) of all sinews and fat and braai over very hot coals for about 8 minutes until medium rare. Let the steak rest a few minutes and then thinly slice.
  4. Unroll the thawed puff pastry on a cutting board. Spread the mushroom and cream paste on half the surface of the pastry and lay the slices of steak on top of that. Generously season with salt and pepper.
  5. Optional step: finely chop smoked ham and grate some cheese. Add this on top of the current residents of the puff pastry.
  6. Fold the uncovered half of the pastry over the filling and use a fork to press all open sides of the pastry closed and seal it.
  7. Now braai in a hinged grid over medium coals for about 20 minutes until ready. You want the pastry golden brown and crispy and all ingredients heated and melted throughout. As puff pastry braais there will be a moment where it seems to ‘melt’ and sag into the grid. Don’t panic. After this it will firm up again and start to cook.

Gebraaide Beef Wellington

Jan Braai Beef WellingtonAlles proe beter op ’n braai, en in die gaval is dit die klassieke ‘Beef Wellington’. Hier is die resep soos ek hom in die Bolandse dorp Wellington gebraai het. Die vulsel bestandele was so ’n bietjie te veel vir een rol pasty deeg, so mettertyd sal ek die resep hier onder nog ’n bietjie aanpas deur 2 rolle deeg (een onder en een bo) of minder vulsel bestandele te gebruik. Jy kan enige van die twee opsies uitoefen wanneer jy hom die naweek by die huis maak, en dan vir my terugvoer gee.

The English version of this Beef Wellington recipe is available here.

Wat jy nodig het

  • 1 ui (fyngekap)
  • 250g sampioene (fyngekap)
  • 1 koppie (250ml) room
  • 1 rol pasty deeg (ontdooi)
  • 300g – 500g steak (rump, sirloin of fillet)
  • kaas (opsioneel)
  • gerookte ham (opsioneel)
  • olyf olie
  • sout & peper

Laat Waai!

  1. Braai die fyngekapte ui en fyngekapte sampioene in ’n pan saam met olyfolie of botter. Gooi dan van of al die room by en laat dit afkook totdat dit ’n dik pasta vorm.
  2. Sny alle oortollige vet en senings van die vleis af en braai die steak oor baie warm kole tot medium-rou. Laat die steaks ’n paar minute rus en sny dit dan in dun repies.
  3. Rol die pastydeeg uit op ’n snyplank en smeer die sampioen room mengsel oor helfte daarvan. Pak die repies steak bo op dit en geur behoorlik met sout en peper. Indien jy so voel kan jy ook kaas en ham bygooi, maar dit is opsioneel.
  4. Vou nou die skoon helfte van die deeg bo-oor toe en druk die kante van jou pasty vas met ’n vurk.
  5. Braai vir omtrent 20 minute oor medium warm kole in ’n toeklaprooster tot gaar. Die gereg is gereed as die deeg goudbruin en bros is, en die bestandele deurwarm en gesmelt is. Soos jy pastydeeg braai ‘smelt’ dit op ’n stadium en begin dit in die rooster insak. Moenie bekommerd wees nie. Net hierna begin dit gaar word en dan raak dit meer verm.

Steak with biltong cream sauce

JanBraai_SS_IMG_009Whilst visiting the Inyati rest camp in the Sabi Sands game reserve I prepared the recipe below on the braai. On that particular occasion the biltong and cream sauce was served with braaied Springbok fillet steaks, but you can just as successfully serve this sauce with normal beef steak. As I don’t have a particularly nice photo of the finished meal, I decided to rather post a picture of the lion cubs we saw later that day after having our meal of braaied Springbok steaks with biltong and cream sauce. The lions had Impala on the menu that day if I remember correctly, but again, posting a pic of their food is probably not family friendly either so here a pic of them having their after dinner drink.

Biltong and cream sauce – What you need

  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 1 tot butter
  • 1 tot olive oil
  • 1 cup finely chopped, grated or blended biltong
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon beef stock (dry, not liquid stock)
  • 1 cup fresh cream

Biltong and cream sauce – What to do

  1. Sauté the onion in the butter and oil for about 4 minutes.
  2. Add the biltong to the pan and let it sweat for a minute or 2.
  3. Add the salt & pepper and half of the cream and stir through.
  4. Sprinkle the beef stock over the contents of the pan and stir through.
  5. Add the rest of the cream, stir and let simmer whilst you braai the steaks until you are happy with the consistency of the sauce.
  6. Braai the steaks until medium rare and serve the sauce on the steak.

BEEF MADRAS CURRY

Madras CurryOne of the best things about Britain is not British at all; it’s Indian. The Brits love their Indian curries and the Madras curry, named after the South Indian town with the same name (now called Chennai) is right up there. The dish has some distinctive flavour notes (as those wine-tasting people would say), which you’ll pick up if you make it with all the correct ingredients as listed below. Madras curry is traditionally very hot, so if the thought of a chilli makes you sweat, rather move along to something else or stay here for a delicious meal but leave out the chilli powder. The spices listed below are all things that should be standard items in your kitchen, so if you need to buy some don’t worry, they won’t go to waste – you’ll use them for many other recipes. This recipe was voted their favourite by participants of the 2014 National Braai Tour.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 4–6)

  • 2 tots vegetable oil
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 1/2 tot cumin seeds (or aniseed – but not star anise)
  • 1/2 tot ground coriander
  • 1/2 tot chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tot paprika
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tot garam masala
  • 1 kg beef (boneless, cut into chunks)
  • 1/2 tot salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 4 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 1 tot crushed fresh ginger (or grated)
  • 1 can chopped tomatoes
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 punnet fresh coriander leaves (to serve)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Heat the oil in a potjie over a medium-sized fire. Add the onion and fry for a few minutes until it’s soft but not brown.
  2. Now the spices go in: cinnamon, cardamom, cumin, coriander, chilli powder (optional), paprika, turmeric and garam masala. Stir for a minute until it starts smelling irresistible. Right about now what I call the ‘word of nose’ phenomenon will kick in. Your neighbours will start calling to invite themselves over for dinner. Stay focused and look at the bottom of the potjie, which might seem very dry. Proceed immediately to the next step.
  3. Add the beef, salt, pepper, garlic and ginger. Fry for a few minutes until the meat starts to brown on all sides. The beef will release some juices. Use this to scrape away any sticky bits of spices at the bottom of the potjie. If you struggle, add a very small amount of water to help you.
  4. Pour in the tomatoes, coconut milk and lemon juice. Bring to a very slight simmer, then cover and cook over a few coals (no flames) for 90 minutes until the meat is tender. Don’t confuse tender meat with a government tender. Tender meat is a good thing.
  5. Serve on rice with a yoghurt and cucumber sauce called raita and fresh coriander leaves.

AND … If your potjie is fairly small and the meat will not be able to brown properly all at the same time, do that in batches first, before you brown the onions. Then set the browned meat aside and simply add it back to the potjie in step 3.

STEAK AND STOUT BEER POTJIE PIE

@janbraai Steak and Stout Beer Potjie PieThe Irish have their own version of National Braai Day, called St Patrick’s Day – the day their country comes to a standstill and has one big party. I’ve been to some St Patrick’s Day celebrations in Dublin as part of my ongoing research and development of National Braai Day. Every single pub in Ireland serves a fantastic pie made with steak and stout. I’ve adapted their recipe to suit our local braai conditions. You make the pie filling in a potjie and you braai the pastry on a grid over the coals. Alternatively, just serve the awesome contents of your potjie on a bed of mash or with a piece of baguette bread!

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 6)

  • 2 tots olive oil
  • 1 kg steak (chuck is best, other- wise rump; cut into blocks of 2 cm × 2 cm)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tot cake flour
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 1 carrot (peeled and finely chopped)
  • 2 sticks celery (finely chopped)
  • 1 tot chopped mixed herbs (rosemary, thyme, parsley; or use 1?2 tot dried mixed herbs)
  • 1 can or bottle stout (about 400 ml)
  • 250 g button mushrooms (halved)
  • 1 packet puff pastry (400 g, completely thawed)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large flat-bottomed potjie over a hot fire. Add the steak cubes, salt and pepper and stir. Shake in the flour, and then stir well to distribute the flour evenly over everything. The bottom of the pot will seem a bit dry, but don’t worry too much about it. Fry for about 5 minutes until the pieces of flour-coated meat turn golden brown.
  2. Add the onion, carrot, celery and herbs, then fry for another 5 minutes.
  3. Now pour in the stout. Stir to loosen any sticky bits on the bottom of the pot, and then bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer gently for 15 minutes.
  4. Add the mushrooms, cover the pot, and then simmer over low heat for 1 hour. It is very important to keep the heat low. ‘Low heat’ means a few coals, and no flames of any significance under the pot.
  5. When the pie filling in the potjie is nearly ready (after about 1 hour of total cooking time), unroll the puff pastry from the packet. Now you have two options: either cut the pastry into the shape of the bowls you’re going to serve the pies in, or cut it into squares that you will put on top of the filling on plates or in bowls. Braai the pastry shapes in an oiled, closed hinged grid for about 20 minutes over very mild coals. Turn the grid often until the pastry is golden brown and crispy. Don’t braai them too fast, as there is a good chance they will burn if you do. The pastry will look like it is starting to ‘melt’ at first; don’t worry, it will soon firm up and become easier to handle if you just carefully turn it quite often. This part is optional, you can also just serve the filling on a bed of mash potatoes or with pieces of baguette bread.
  6. When the filling is ready, take the potjie off the fire and stir well. The liquid should be thick and glossy. If not, cook uncovered for a few minutes to let it reduce and thicken. Taste and add salt and pepper if necessary.
  7. Serve by dishing up the filling into bowls or onto plates and then put the braaied pieces of pastry on top of each of them. You could also serve the pies with mashed potatoes if you like.

AND … Although Guinness is the internationally famous example of stout, it’s by no means the only one. You can make this recipe just as effectively with a local favourite like Castle Milk Stout.

Steak with Smoked Mussel Sauce

So there we were in Mosselbaai (direct translation – Mussel Bay) on the South Coast of South Africa, the greatest country in the world. All set for a feast of mussels on the ‘Jan Braai vir Erfenis’ TV show. But as luck would have it, the sea was hit by a severe case of red-tide at the time, and we could not eat any fresh mussels due to the health hazzard. Now you cannot make a braai TV show in a town called Mussel Bay and not eat any mussels, so my attention turned to smoked mussels. And this is where we got lucky. The red-tide forced me to develop one of the greatest sauces ever to grace the presence of a medium rare braaied steak. My process started by looking at the intricacies of the classic Carpetbag steak, something described as “a luxury dish, probably of American derivation”. We went way beyond that.

What you need (serves 6)

  • 6 steaks of about 300g each
  • oil or butter
  • 1 onion (chopped)
  • 3 cloves garlic (crushed)
  • 250g bacon (1 pack – diced into blocks or strips)
  • 250g mushrooms (1 pack)
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 x 85g tins of smoked mussels (drained)
  • 250ml fresh cream (1 cup)
  • 50g – 100g pecorino or parmesan cheese (grated)
  • salt & pepper (to taste)
What to do
  1. Fry the chopped onion in the oil or butter until it starts to get personality and then add the crushed garlic and diced bacon. Sauté until it starts to stick to the bottom of the pan.
  2. Add the mushrooms and stir-fry for another minute.
  3. Add the two tins of drained smoked mussels and gently toss. From here on in, go gentle so that the mussels to not break apart to much.
  4. Squeeze the juice of half a lemon into the sauce and gently toss.
  5. Mix in half a cup of the cream. As the sauce thickens later, you can mix in the other half of the cream as well.
  6. Add the grated cheese and gently toss. If you cannot get hold of pecorino, just use aged white cheddar.
  7. Test the sauce and add salt & pepper to taste.
  8. If the sauce is getting a but thick, add the rest of the cream.
  9. Keep the sauce warm.
  10. Braai the steaks over very hot coals for 7 – 10 minutes until medium rare. Here is a complete description on how to braai the perfect steak.
  11. Serve the smoked mussel sauce on the perfectly braaied steaks.
And
If you cannot get hold of smoked mussels, use tins of smoked oysters.

Chilli Con Carne

Chilli con carne works equally well for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Perfect for a surf trip, hunting trip or anywhere else you might want to serve a warm and spicy meal to a hungry crowd! The nice thing is that it actually improves after standing a few hours, so you could prepare it in your potjie, and then go into the sea or veld, and upon your return when everyone is cold and hungry, you can just warm it up and bask in the glory. Don’t be put off by the fairly long list of ingredients – the method makes up for it as it’s very straightforward. Serve it as is or with a piece of bread.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 4)

  • 2 tots olive oil
  • 2 onions (finely chopped)
  • 4 cloves garlic (crushed or chopped)
  • 1 red pepper (seeds and stalks removed, then chopped)
  • 500 g lean beef mince
  • 1 carrot (grated)
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp chilli powder (or cayenne pepper)
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 2 cans chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tot tomato paste (or 1 50 g sachet)
  • 1 can borlotti beans (drained and rinsed under cold water)
  • 1 can chickpeas (drained and rinsed under cold water)
  • 1 tot vinegar
  • 1/2 tot sugar
  • 1/2 tot salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup sour cream (250 ml tub, to serve)
  • fresh coriander leaves (to serve)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Heat the oil in a potjie over a hot fire. Add the onions, garlic and red pepper and fry for 5–10 minutes until the onions are soft and the edges start to turn a bit brown.
  2. Tip in the mince, stir and break up any lumps with a wooden spoon. Fry for about 10 minutes until the beef starts to ‘catch’ on the bottom of the pan, taking care not to let it burn.
  3. Add the carrot, paprika, cumin, chilli powder and coriander, and stir well.
  4. To this, throw in the tomatoes, tomato paste, beans, chickpeas, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper, and then stir well.
  5. Bring the mixture to the boil, then cook for about 15 minutes, stirring every now and then to make sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom.
  6. Remove from the fire and serve with a dollop (ja, I know, I don’t like the word ‘dollop’ either, but the editor insisted that it’s the best way to describe it; so there you go, ‘dollop’ made it into the final draft of my book) of sour cream and some fresh coriander leaves. Alternatively, you could take the potjie off the fire, let it rest somewhere with the lid on, and reheat it a few hours later before serving.

AND …

If you’re planning to prepare this meal when you’re on the road, don’t pack all the bottles and packs of spices. Just measure them out at home and throw them together in one small bag or container.

Recipe & photo copyright: JanBraai

Beef trinchado potjie

Apart from being the first tourists to dock a ship at Mossel Bay, the Portuguese are also famous for a few culinary achievements. One of their best is the rich garlic and chilli-flavoured beef stew known as trinchado. Theoretically, the quantity of ingredients in this recipe means that you can serve 8 people, but in my experience it’s one of those meals that are just too good, which means everyone wants second helpings.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 6–8)

  • 2 kg steak cubes (I use a combination of rib-eye and rump, cut into 4 cm cubes)
  • 2 tots soy sauce
  • 2 tots olive oil
  • 2 tots butter
  • 2 onions (finely chopped)
  • 10 garlic cloves (crushed or chopped)
  • 1/2 tot cayenne pepper (or chilli powder)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 1/2 cup brandy (no, not a typing error)
  • 1/2 cup red wine (no, not a typing error)
  • 1/2 tot salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • a big handful of pitted black
  • olives (this is not an exact science)
  • 1 cup cream (250 ml tub)
  • grated rind of a small lemon

WHAT TO DO

  1. Pour the soy sauce over the steak cubes. Now you need to fry the meat to seal in the juices and you’ll have to do this in batches. Generate some proper heat in your potjie by placing flames directly under it. Then add a tot of oil and a tot of butter and fry about one-third of the meat, or as much as fits in the bottom of the potjie. You could of course fry all of the meat at once if your potjie is big enough. Take the cubes out and keep to one side. Add another tot of oil and butter and fry the next third. By the time you get to the last batch of steak cubes there will be enough oil and fat left in the potjie.
  2. When the last batch of meat is browned, put back all the other meat into the potjie, unless you fried it all at once. Add the onions, garlic, cayenne pepper and bay leaves; then fry for about 10 minutes until the onions are soft.
  3. Pour in the beef stock, brandy, wine, salt and pepper. Heat until the sauce starts to simmer, then cover with a lid and continue to gently simmer for 1 hour until the meat is very tender.
  4. Remove the lid and stir in the olives, cream and lemon rind. Bring to the boil and then cook for a further 10 minutes, uncovered, until the sauce starts to get thicker.
  5. Remove from the fire and let it stand for a few minutes before serving. The generous amount of sauce is part of this meal and should be enjoyed with the meat, so serve trinchado in bowls and eat the sauce with spoons when necessary.

AND …

I know it sounds like a bit of a mission to grate lemon rind, but in some instances you really have to do it, this being one of those cases. Grating the rind of a lemon is really not a challenging job; it smells nice and it’ll make you look like the type of expert who reads this book. It adds a unique flavour to this dish that would just not be the same without it.

Beef Burger with bacon and a cheese sauce

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 6)

For the cheese sauce:

  • 2 tots butter
  • 2 tots cake flour
  • 2 cups milk (full cream, obviously)
  • 1 tot Dijon mustard
  • at least 1 cup grated mature cheese (1 cup of grated cheese is
  • about 100 g, but err on the side of extravagance – I use a mixture of
  • Cheddar, Parmesan and whatever else happens to be in my fridge)
  • salt and black pepper to taste (not all cheese has the same salt content)

For the burgers:

  • 1 kg good-quality beef mince
  • 1 tot olive oil
  • salt and pepper (optional)
  • 1 packet smoked streaky bacon (200–250 g)
  • 6 hamburger rolls (sliced open and buttered on the insides)
  • lettuce leaves (washed and drained)
  • 2 large tomatoes (sliced)

WHAT TO DO

Make the cheese sauce:

  1. Melt the butter in a pot over medium heat and then add the flour. Stir until the flour is mixed smoothly with the butter, and then cook for 1 minute, stirring all the time.
  2. Pour in the milk bit by bit while stirring vigorously to incorporate it completely and make a smooth sauce. A wooden spoon should work fine, but if you struggle, use a metal hand whisk. Never leave the sauce unattended; believe me, I speak from experience. If at any time you feel you’re losing control, decrease the amount of heat reaching the pot and first fully combine everything already in the pot before adding more milk.
  3. As soon as all the milk has been incorporated, toss in the mustard and cheese. Stir well until the cheese has melted.
  4. Take the pot off the heat and test for seasoning. Add salt and pepper if the sauce needs it. Some cheeses are very salty already and the sauce will only need a decent grinding of black pepper. Keep the sauce aside until the burgers are ready. Reheat and stir just before pouring it over the burgers – and don’t worry about that ‘skin’ forming on top of the sauce, for it stirs away. Alternatively, make the sauce while braaing the patties.

Make the burgers:

  1. Divide the mince into 6 balls, then use your clean wet hands to shape them into patties. Always flatten them a little more than you think, because they will shrink and thicken in the middle during the braai. Brush them with olive oil on both sides.
  2. Put the patties on an open grid and season the top with salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes, then carefully (yet confidently) flip them over with a metal spatula. Season with salt and pepper, and cook for another 5 minutes on the other side – 10 minutes in total. To be clear, you only turn the patties once on the braai. Every time you turn them, there is a risk of breaking them. Don’t fiddle with the patties while they are on the braai, because it only makes you look like a beginner.
  3. While you’re braaing the patties, also braai the bacon until crispy. You can do this in a pan, or you can lay the rashers out on the braai grid, and also only turn them once. Take care not to drop any bacon through the grid onto the coals.
  4. Put the sliced rolls buttered side down on the grid, then toast until they are golden brown. Take them off the fire. Don’t burn the rolls; it happens easily.
  5. To assemble the burgers: Put a piece of lettuce and 2 slices of tomato on the bottom half of the roll. The strips of crispy bacon go on next, then the braaied patty. Top it off with a generous helping of warm cheese sauce.
Recipe & photo copyright: JanBraai

fillet with red wine sauce

It’s a well-recognised fact that braaied steak goes well with red wine. What is further undisputed is that a steak braaied over the coals of an open wood fire has a unique, rather good taste. What we’re doing here is combining these universally accepted truths to create something that is, dare I say it, beautiful!

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 4)

  • 1 kg fillet steak (or slightly bigger)
  • 1 tot butter
  • 1/2 onion (chopped as finely as you can)
  • 1 clove garlic (chopped very finely)
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 1/2 tot flour
  • 1 1/2 cups red wine
  • 1/2 cup beef stock
  • 2 tots sugar
  • 1 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper (optional – to taste)

WHAT TO DO

  1. Light a relatively big fire using your favourite braai wood.
  2. Remove the steak from its packaging. Rinse it under cold running water and pat dry with kitchen towels. Cut it into four equally sized portions and then season them well with salt and pepper. Don’t be shy with the pepper. Cover the steak to keep it safe from flies and proceed to the next step.
  3. Place a medium-sized flameproof pan or potjie over the fire. You want a pretty high heat but it must not be searing hot, so just use some of the burning logs under the potjie, not all of them.
  4. Melt the butter and then fry the onions, garlic and thyme leaves for about 5 minutes until the onion is soft and starts to turn brown. If you’re a regular user of this book and are tuned in to the finer things in life, fry the onions first and add the garlic about 1 minute before the next step.
  5. Add the flour and stir well, then immediately add the red wine, stock, sugar and vinegar. Mix well, bring to the boil and then boil over high heat to reduce the liquid by half. Stir often. Depending on the size of your pot and the heat of your fire, this should take 15 minutes, but it could be slightly longer or slightly shorter. While the liquid is reducing, it should thicken and become a rich sauce. Taste the sauce at this point and season with salt and pepper. Keep in mind that some beef stocks are already quite salty, so you might not need salt at all. When you’re happy with the texture of the sauce, remove from the fire.
  6. While you’re waiting for the sauce to reduce in step 5, braai the steaks over very high heat for about 8–10 minutes. Braai them on all four or six sides. That’s right, when you slice a 1 kg fillet steak into 4 pieces the shape of the fillet steaks can have four or six sides.
  7. Serve the steaks on warm plates and pour the red wine sauce over them.

AND …

The truth of the matter is that you could serve this sauce with any other cut of beautifully braaied steak. Personally, I’m quite attached to serving it with fillet because although fillet is so wonderfully tender, the sauce gives it that little kick of extra flavour it needs.

Recipe & photo copyright: JanBraai

Shish Kebabs

Shish kebabs are a Turkish version of what we generally call sosaties. The Turks love to skewer spicy marinated meat with tomatoes, peppers, onions and mushrooms, and I reckon they’re on the money. Let the meat marinate overnight to allow the flavours to develop to their full potential, and for the meat to absorb them properly.

WHAT YOU NEED (makes 6–8 kebabs)

For the marinade:

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2 tot ground cumin
  • 1/2 tot ground paprika
  • 1/2 tot ground coriander
  • 1/2 tot dried oregano
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper

For the kebabs:

  • 1 kg steak (rump, sirloin, rib-eye or fillet, cut into 3 cm by 3 cm cubes) or 1kg lamb meat
  • 2 onions (cut into large chunks, with layers separated)
  • 2 peppers (green, yellow or red – seeds and stalks removed, and cut into square chunks)
  • 250 g small button mushrooms (whole)
  • 250 g cherry tomatoes

WHAT TO DO

  1. Throw all the ingredients for the marinade together in a marinating bowl and mix well. Toss the beef cubes into the mix and stir until all the pieces are coated in marinade. Cover the bowl and marinate for at least 3 hours (on your counter or somewhere in the shade), but preferably overnight. Whenever you feel like it, you can visit the meat and stir it around before putting it back in the fridge.
  2. Around the time that you’re lighting the fire for your braai, remove the marinated meat from the fridge and wash your hands for the assembling process. Skewer the beef cubes by alternating with pieces of onion, peppers, whole mushrooms and cherry tomatoes, packing them tightly together. Brush the assembled kebabs with any leftover marinade.
  3. Braai the kebabs for about 8 minutes over hot coals. The kebabs can be quite fragile, so braaing them in a hinged grid that you close gently is the way to go.
Recipe & photo copyright: JanBraai

 

Peri Peri Sauce

The use of peri-peri chillies and sauces filtered into South Africa from our Portuguese-speaking neighbouring countries Mozambique and Angola. The peri-peri (also called African Bird’s Eye or Piri-Piri) chilli is a member of the capsicum family of chillies. Compared to the average chilli it’s quite small and very hot. If you can’t get hold of it, use any small and potent chilli. But best is to get yourself a plant and cultivate them at home; they grow quite easily in most parts of South Africa.

In real braai life you will use peri-peri sauce often. It goes particularly well with braaied steak, chicken, fish and prawns. Due to the combination of ingredients it will easily last for weeks inside your fridge and the flavour gets even better after standing for a few days. I suggest you make it in large quantities.

What you need

  • 8 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • ½ cup oil
  • ½ cup grape vinegar (red or white)
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 tot paprika powder
  • 1 tot chilli powder
  • 1 tot salt
  • a few small hot chillies (peri-peri/African Bird’s Eye – chopped)

What to do

  1. Finely chop the garlic and throw this into a glass bottle or jar with the oil, vinegar, lemon juice, water, paprika powder, chilli powder and salt. Shake well until the ingredients are mixed and all the salt dissolved.
  2. Now taste the sauce and if you want it hotter, add one or more finely chopped chillies to the sauce and shake. You can add as many chillies as you wish and if, like me, you like quite a lot of burn then it might be wise to mix two batches, one with fewer chillies.
  3. Do not touch your eyes or any other sensitive parts of your body while you are making this sauce as the traces of chilli juice left on your hands will burn those sensitive parts. Go and wash your hands to get the chilli juices off them, and then still be careful.
  4. The sauce can be used immediately but will improve with age and last in your fridge for weeks. You will use the sauce as a marinade, basting sauce or normal dipping sauce on braaied food.

Pan braaied steak flambe

This recipe was pioneered during the great Braai Tour of South Africa in 2011. It was Day 34 of the tour and all members of the touring party was understandably used to a very high level of braaing. Normal meat for normal people wasn’t cutting it anymore. For the first time in quite a while it was just the six members of the touring party, nobody else. We were in Baviaanskloof and sleeping in a cave; we had about 3 kilograms of rump steak between the six of us and the film crew wanted something special as this was also the last braai of a TV episode. I went with pan braaied steak flambe for starters (this recipe) and steak prego rolls for mains. After the episode aired there were quite a few emails asking for the recipe. Here it is.

The actual braai took place in the dark, and as we were filming during that for the TV show, no flashlight photography was possible.

Ingredients

  • Matured Rump steak (100 grams pp for starters, 200 – 300 grams pp for mains)
  • Olive Oil
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Klipdrift
  • Cream (optional)
Method
  1. Pat salt and pepper into/onto both sides of the steak.
  2. Place the pan over the flames. This recipe works very well as a starter as it is best prepared whilst the fire is still burning. Use an old pan, or a cast iron pan, or whatever pan you generally use on the fire.
  3. Generously add some olive oil to the pan. You might even want to put the oil in the pan before putting the pan on the flames.
  4. As soon as the oil is really really hot, place the steak in the pan. Take care not to splash some of the boiling hot oil on yourself. The pan can stay on the flames during this whole process.
  5. Turn the meat after about 2 minutes and remove from the fire after about another 2 minutes (very thin steak shorter, very thick steak longer).
  6. Add a generous dash of brandy to the pan, take the pan back to the flames and slightly tilt so that the brandy can catch fire.
  7. Remove the pan from fire and let the meat rest for a few minutes.
  8. Cut the steak into strips (in the pan, or on a cutting board) and return the meat to the pan, so that it can further absorb some of the sauces in the pan.
  9. Serve as is, potentially grinding additional sea salt onto the meat if needed.
Additional Advice
  • Originally I served this recipe as is from the pan to everyone around the fire. If you are going to plate it, let the meat rest on a cutting board before you slice it up. Whilst the meat is resting add a dash of cream to the sauce in the pan, bring to boil and use that combined sauce (essentially consisting of olive oil, meat juice, salt & pepper & cream) on the plated steak strips.
  • You can obviously also just add cream to the sauce even when serving straight up from the pan.

How to braai the perfect steak

How to braai the perfect steak.

The one thing that you really should be able to comfortably braai perfectly at your own house is a steak. If you stick to a few basic guidelines and pay attention to what you are doing, this is a skill that you will master in no time. Once you can comfortably braai a steak perfectly at home, the knowledge, skill and experience can also serve as the foundation for doing it anywhere else, in whatever strange braai conditions life might throw at you. Braaing the perfect steak assumes that the actual steak that you are braaing is of a certain quality. However good you braai it, a bad piece of meat is never going to turn out great.

1) The steak should be at room temperature by the time it goes onto the fire.

  • If is was/is in a fridge, take it out well in advance, and leave it in the shade or indoors. (When you make the effort to buy great steaks, you are probably not going to freeze them, but should the steaks that you want to braai be frozen, transfer them from the freezer to the fridge at least a day in advance to allow them to thaw at a gentle pace).
  • Its already 100% protein, so cover it with a cloth to keep the flies and bugs away. If there are dogs, place it well outside their reach.

2) You need copious amounts of extremely hot coals.

  • If, and this is preferable, you are making a real fire with real wood, make a big fire from the outset. Do not make a medium sized fire and add more wood later. By the time the second batch of wood has burned out, the coals of the first batch will be half dead. Once the meat goes onto the fire, the process will be over quickly, so if you want to stand around the fire and discuss life with your guests for a few hours before you eat, make a medium sized fire by all means. But when you intent to braai, add lots of wood, wait till its burned out, and braai.
  • If there was only wet wood available at the petrol station and you are using charcoal, light quite a lot of it. For a small braai, consider half a bag. Its not uncommon for me to use a whole bag of charcoal when braaing steaks for a dinner party.
  • If you are wondering whether you have enough heat, then the answer is probably no. For these easy steps to a perfect steak to work, you need peace of mind that your coals are extremely hot. This is important.

    To braai the perfect steak you need lots of really hot coals.

3) The exact height of your grid is not important. Anything between 5 and 15 centimetres is fine.

  • The important thing is that you when you braai steaks at your own house, you always braai them on the same height, and that you know exactly what that height is.
  • When you are braaing at a new location, you should compare the height of the grid to the height of the grid when braaing steaks at home, and adjust braaing time accordingly.

4) Steaks should be done medium rare.

  • If you really prefer your steaks rare and aren’t just saying it to try and sound rougher than everybody else ordering medium rare, then you should not be ordering rare steaks anyhow. There are two great dishes for you to try. Steak Tartar, and Beef Carpaccio.
  • If you prefer your steaks medium, then start buying better quality steaks, learn how to braai them better, and acquire the acquired taste of enjoying them medium rare.
  • If you prefer your steaks medium well or well done, then why exactly are you reading this? You are surely quite capable of messing up meat all by yourself.
  • If one of your guests wants their steak medium, and you prepared enough extremely hot coals to start with, then there will be quite enough heat to get her steak medium by the time everybody else has been seated and served.
  • If one of your guests wants their steak medium well or well done, refuse.

5) Take the time when the steaks go onto the grid and take them off after about 7 minutes.

  • Steaks cut to a thickness of 2,5cm to 3cm, braaied on extremely hot coals and a 10cm grid height take about 7 minutes in total to become medium rare.
  • After 2 minutes turn the steaks. After another 2 minutes, turn them again; now turn after 1:30 more minutes, and then a final 1:30. They are now ready.
  • It’s perfectly acceptable to ask someone else to keep the time.

6) Use braai tongs, not a fork, to turn the meat. A fork will make holes in the meat, and you might lose some juice.

7) After the first turn of the meat, you may start salting, spicing or basting the meat.

  • Adding salt before this might cause the salt to draw out some of the moisture in the meat. This is a high school science concept known as osmoses.
  • Rubbing salt or spice into the meat shortly before the braai will not draw out any significant amount of moisture and is thus fine. There is a risk that some ingredients in the spice will burn on the extremely hot coals though.
  • Adding salt before the braai does not make the meat tough. Buying bad quality meat makes the meat tough.

8) If you are using a closed grid (toeklaprooster) then all the steaks will obviously be turned at the same time. If you are turning the steaks one by one then turn them in the order that they went onto the grill and also remove them from the grid in that order.

9) Meat needs to “rest” a bit after the braai, before you eat it.

  • This gives the juices in the meat the opportunity to settle down, and not all run out when you cut the meat.
  • What you need to watch out for when resting meat is that it does not end up cold by the time you eat it. There are two easy ways to counter this problem. Heat the bowl that you are placing the meat into when taking them from the fire; and heat the plates you will be eating the steaks from.
  • By the time that everybody have been seated and served, the meat has rested enough.
  • Do not put the steaks in an aluminium braai bowl with lots of other meat and into an oven where they will steam cook for another hour whilst some fool is braaing his frozen chicken. Your steaks will be ruined by the time you eat them.

After having followed the above steps you need to make an honest assenement of whether the steaks were perfect. If they were not, you need to repeat the above steps, making slight adjustments until you have fine tuned your technique to perfection. The most obvious mistakes to make:

  • If the steaks are burnt black on the outside, there is a very good chance that its not the meat, but the marinade or spices that are burnt. The easiest way to get rid of this problem is by using a different, or even better, no marinade in future.
  • If the steaks are done medium or well, then they were probably cut to thin. Use steaks that are thicker in future, or, braai the same steaks but for a shorter time.
  • If the steaks look great when you slice it and look at it from the side, but are quite tough to chew, then they probably come form a badly raised animal, or they were not aged properly, or both. Buy your steaks at a different place in future.
  • If the steaks are underdone, then your fire was not warm enough. Repeat the process, and really go all out with that fire next time. You will be surprised how much heat a piece of un-marinated meat can withstand for 7 minutes without getting burned.

Once you can perfectly braai steaks at your own house, it’s easy to do it anywhere else as well. If there are less than ideal coals, try to set the grid very low. If the steaks are cut exceptionally thick, braai them longer and vice versa when they are cut especially thin. If the grid only has one setting and that is very high, allow a little extra braaing time.

The Braai Turtles

This will not really work on a braai, but next time you fire up your man oven* to roast a chicken, perhaps braai a few turtles for the kids.

Who will they love more? Mother that makes them bath or father that gives them this?

  • Handmade beef mince patties.
  • Topped with cheddar cheese.
  • Wrapped in a bacon weave.
  • Add cut viennas as the heads, legs and tail.
  • Bake in Man Oven* for 20 – 30 minutes.

* If you dont know what a Man Oven is, take this link.

Thank you Tobias

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