Pork Recipes

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PORK SCHNITZEL

JANBRAAI PORKSCHNITZELThe great thing about the braai is that you can make any food on the fire. This schnitzel recipe is based on the original from Germany where it was made on a stove but as always, everything is better around a fire!

WHAT YOU NEED: (feeds 4)

  • 4 pork loin steaks of about 1 cm thick
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 250 ml breadcrumbs, fresh or toasted
  • 250 ml flour
  • Salt and pepper
  • Combination of olive oil and butter for frying
  • Mustard and fresh lemon slices for serving

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Place the pork steaks on a flat surface, get a rolling pin, wine bottle or anything with enough weight. Use cling wrap and place a layer on top of the meat to protect them and keep them intact while you hit them with your rolling pin, flattening the steaks and making them even all over.
  2. Now construct your work station. Season the flour with salt and pepper and place in a flat bowl. Place the beaten egg in another bowl and the breadcrumbs in a bowl. Start to coat your steaks by first rolling them around in the seasoned flour, then dip them in the egg and lastly cover the steaks with breadcrumbs making sure everything is covered.
  3. Heat a combination of oil and butter in your pan and fry the steaks for 2 to 3 minutes turning often making sure it does not burn. The steaks are thin hence they will be done very quickly.
  4. Remove from the heat and serve this work of art dish with mustard, fresh lemons and a side dish of potato salad.

SCHWEINSHAXE (BRAAIED PORK KNUCKlES)

eisbeinSchweinshaxe is a German dish, famous the world over. You start off by cooking pork hocks or eisbein until they are very tender. Then you braai them over hot coals to give them a great flavour and make them crispy. This tastes far superior to the classic German version where you just grill them in an oven to finish them off. If your butcher or supermarket only has smoked pork hocks or smoked eisbein, don’t worry; it works just as well and obviously your meal will have an even deeper smoky flavour.

WHAT YOU NEED (serves 4)

  • 4 small pork hocks or eisbeins (regular or smoked)
  • 2 bottles apple cider (like Hunters or Savanna)
  • 2 cups water
  • salt

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Put everything into a large potjie. The liquid should just cover the pork, so add extra water if necessary.
  2. Put the potjie over a hot fire, then cover with a lid and bring to the boil. Simmer (it mustn’t boil rapidly) for 2½–3 hours, then take it off the fire. You want the meat nice and soft but not falling off the bone. You should check on the meat during this time as it might be ready sooner; this is not an exact science.
  3. Use braai tongs to lift the cooked pork hocks out of the potjie, shake off the liquid and then generously salt them (smoked hocks will generally be very salty already, and will not need any extra salt).
  4. Now for the braai: You’ll need an open grid as a hinged grid won’t close over the hocks. Braai for about 20 minutes in total over hot coals until they are nicely browned on all sides. Remember, the meat is already cooked so you just want to give it some crunch, colour and flavour.
  5. Serve immediately with mashed potatoes that you flavour with cream, wholegrain mustard, salt and pepper.AND …
    If your pork is cooked before you’re ready to braai, take the potjie off the coals and let the hocks rest in the water – an hour or two of resting in lukewarm water will just result in more tender pork.

Pulled Pork Potjie

JBVE6_EP02_IMG_023The concept of pulled pork is very simple. We start with a very cheap cut of meat that is fairly tough. The meat is generously spiced until it has real attitude and we then slow-cook it in a potjie until it’s so soft we can just pull it apart. Pulled pork is not really a meal for two. The size of the meat and time it takes to prepare means that when it’s pulled pork, it’s a party! This recipe is incredibly easy, especially if you follow it. Phone you butcher ahead of time and ask him to prepare a 2 kg piece of deboned pork shoulder. For a competent butcher this is a piece of cake and it’s not a particularly expensive cut of meat either. Failing this, 2 kg of pork shoulder on the bone will work just as well. Supermarkets generally sell pieces of pork meat of roughly this size. Your weapon of choice here is a no. 2 or no. 3 three-legged potjie or a no. 10 flat-bottomed one. You make the dressing sauce ahead of time and you’ll also do most of the work for the pork a few hours in advance. By the time your party guests arrive, all you need to do is occasionally add a few coals under the potjie and of course, serve up a great meal.

WHAT YOU NEED (feeds 10)

TO PREPARE THE MEAT

  • 2 kg pork shoulder (or other piece of pork meat)
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp mustard powder
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tot paprika
  • 1 tot brown sugar

FOR THE POTJIE

  • 1 tot olive oil
  • 1 onion (sliced)
  • 4 garlic cloves (crushed)
  • 3 cups liquid (see step 6)

FOR THE RANCH SAUCE

  • 1 bottle buttermilk (2 cups)
  • 1 tub sour cream
  • 3 tots chives (freshly chopped)
  • 1 tot Dijon mustard
  • 1 lemon (juice and zest)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper

WHAT TO DO

  1. To make the sauce you shake the bottle of buttermilk before opening its top. Now throw that and all the other ingredients for the sauce in a bowl or jug and mix well. Cover whatever the sauce is in and put in in your fridge until you’re ready to serve the meal.
  2. Prepare the meat by mixing all the spices together then rub the spice blend into the pork shoulder.
  3. Get some flames under the potjie, add the oil and onion, and fry the onion for a few minutes.
  4. Now add the garlic and the whole chunk of pork to the potjie.
  5. Brown the pork shoulder on all sides. You can take as long as you like to do this but aim for 10 minutes.
  6. Your cooking liquid should be 3 cups in total – 2 cups of chicken stock and 1 cup of beer, cider, white wine, red wine, apple juice or ginger ale. Add all 3 cups to the potjie and let the potjie heat up to a gentle simmer. Now close the lid. The potjie should bubble very slowly for 3 to 4 hours until the meat is very soft and starts to fall apart by itself. Every half hour or so you can lift the lid and flip the meat over. If at any time the potjie is running dry, add a bit more cooking liquid, using any of the options.
  7. When the pork is done, remove from the fire and let it rest somewhere to relax a bit. Use two forks to pull apart and shred the pork. Taste a piece and congratulate yourself. Now mix all the pulled pork with all the remaining liquid in the potjie.
  8. Your guests can build their own creations by piling a generous helping of pulled pork meat onto a roll, and topping it with ranch sauce, slices of gherkin and slices of onion.

AND…

Make the rolls with 10 soft burger rolls, 4 big gherkins (sliced into thin strips with a vegetable peeler), and 1 red onion (thinly sliced).

Pork Neck Curry

JanBraai Pork Neck Curry

I have absolutely no idea how this curry tastes when it’s cold or what it’s like the next day. It always gets completely polished off during the eating of the meal. Your ratio of great food to effort is very high here too and if it takes you more than 1 hour from the first step to serving the meal, you’re doing something wrong. The pork neck chops are tender to begin with so there’s no need for hours of simmering. The two tots medium curry powder used in the recipe is not a printing error so do add all of it. Medium curry powder really does not have a lot of chilli in it. Adding this much packs the meal with spice and flavour while still keeping the mouth-burn levels way below anything that should concern you or your guests.

What you need (feeds 4)

  • 8 pork neck chops 1 lemon (juice)
  • 1 tot oil or butter
  • 2 onions
  • 4 cloves garlic (chopped)
  • ginger, equal in volume to
  • the garlic (grated)
  • 2 tots medium curry powder
  • 2 tots apricot jam
  • 2 tots tomato paste (or a 50 g sachet)
  • 1?2 tot salt
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 cup cream

What to do:

  1. Cut each pork neck chop in half, throw them in a bowl, and squeeze the lemon juice over them. Toss around to distribute the lemon juice evenly.
  2. Heat the oil in your potjie and fry the onions for about 4 minutes.
  3. Now add the garlic, ginger and curry powder, and toss together for a minute.
  4. Add the pork chops and fry in the potjie until all of them have a bit of colour.
  5. Add the apricot jam, tomato paste and salt, and stir in.
  6. Now pour in some of the water and use it to scrape loose all the sticky bits on the bottom of the potjie. Once you’re satisfied with your efforts, add the rest of the water and mix it in.
  7. Heat the potjie to a simmer and close the lid. After 20 minutes, remove the lid and let it continue to simmer until half of the liquid has reduced and evaporated.
  8. Stir in the cream and let it continue to simmer until half of the liquid has reduced again. Practically speaking, let the potjie boil without the lid until you are happy with the consistency of the sauce.
  9. Remove the potjie from the fire and serve with basmati rice, yogurt and chopped cucumber, tomato and onion.

And…

This recipe also works well with chicken. Use a pack of 4 thighs and 4 drumsticks, pull off and discard their skins, drizzle with the lemon juice, and continue from step 2.

Pork Chop Carbonara

Pork Chop CarbonaraWhat we have here is the recipe for my Braaied Pork Chop Carbonara. I obviously found inspiration for this one in the classic Italian pasta from Rome, the Bacon Carbonara. It is interesting to note that Carbonaro is the Italian word for Charcoal Burner. Now as we all know, there is one thing better than a charcoal burner, and that is a wood burner, otherwise known as a braai fire. The original recipe from Rome uses Italian bacon like guanciale or pancetta but to my mind a braaied South African pork chop is vastly superior in quality, taste and texture so what we have here is an improvement on the original recipe. The recipe works well with both fresh and dry pasta, but as egg is a core ingredient my personal feeling is that fresh pasta works better, so go for that if you can hold of it.

What you need (serves 4)

  • 4 Pork loin chops (deboned) or 4 Pork Neck Chops
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 tot butter
  • 1 tot Olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves crushed
  • 250 g mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 125 ml Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 250 ml fresh cream
  • 400g – 500g Linguini or Spaghetti
  • Extra Parmesan for garnish
  • Fresh Parsley for garnish

What to do:

  1. Braai the pork chops over medium-hot coal for about 12 minutes until done. Pork chops should be braaied until medium, with an internal temperature of 71 °C. Season with salt and pepper before or during the braai.
  2. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water according to the instructions on the packet. Use fresh pasta if possible.
  3. Heat the butter and olive oil in a pan and fry the mushrooms for a few minutes, add the garlic and fry until the mushrooms are soft.
  4. Beat the eggs and properly mix that with the cream. Also mix the grated cheese with that.
  5. Remove the pasta from the heat when cooked and drain. Add the pasta to the same pot or pan as the mushrooms and pour over the mixture of beaten eggs, cream and cheese while the pasta is still hot and mix well. The heat of the pasta and mushrooms will cook the egg. This is a signature part of this dish.
  6. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
  7. Diagonally slice the pork chops into thin slivers and serve on top of the pasta. Garnish with extra parmesan and fresh parsley.

Pork Spare Ribs

There are three reasons why pork spare ribs taste so great. First, their relatively high fat content which bastes and flavours the meat as it braais; secondly, the high bone-to-meat ratio which means that the bones impart further flavour to the meat as they heat up during the braai; thirdly, that sweet and sticky sauce we usually enjoy with them. But marinades and sauces that contain sugar burn easily, so there are two things that can go wrong when you braai spare ribs:

  1. You remove them from the fire when you think the marinade is starting to burn, but then find the insides still raw.
  2. You braai them until the inside is done, but by that stage the marinade is burnt.

There is a very easy way to get around these two problems, which is to braai first and marinade later. Don’t marinade or baste the ribs, just braai them and remove them from the fire about 5 minutes before they are ready. Generously smother them in the sauce, then return them to the fire and complete the braai. The ribs will be properly cooked inside and your sauce will be nicely glazed without being burnt.

What you need (feeds 4)

  • 1.5 kg pork spare ribs
  • ½ cup honey (or golden syrup)
  • ½ cup tomato sauce
  • 1 tot apple juice
  • ½ tot soy sauce
  • ½ tot paprika

 What to do

  1. Prepare the sauce: Mix all the ingredients (except for the ribs) together in a bowl. If there is anything else you wish to add to the sauce, do so.
  2. Braai the whole spare ribs over medium heat for 30 minutes until almost done.
  3. Remove the ribs from the fire and place on a cutting board. Cut into single ribs.
  4. Toss the ribs into the sauce bowl and coat them well. Use a spoon and/or shake the bowl around. Leave for a minute or three so that the exposed, meaty parts of the ribs can bond with and absorb the sauce.
  5. Braai the now generously basted ribs for between 2 and 10 minutes until all the sauce is warm and glazed. If during the cutting you saw that the ribs are basically done and will start to dry out, just braai them for a minute or two until the sauce is glazed, but if you saw they still have a way to go, make it closer to 10 minutes or even longer, also exposing the two recently cut sides of each rib to heat by letting them face the coals.

Honey adds a unique flavour to this recipe but you could also substitute golden syrup.

© Jan Braai (photo & recipe)

Kassler parcels

Ingredients

  • 6 kassler steaks
  • mustard
  • butter
  • 6 cloves
  • 6 pineapple rings (from a tin)

Method

  1. Lubricate 6 pieces of tinfoil, big enough for a kassler steak each, with Olive Oil, Butter or Spray&Cook.
  2. Smear both sides of the steaks with a little mustard and place on tinfoil.
  3. Top with a pineapple ring with a clove stuck into it.
  4. Place a dollop of butter in the middel of each ring.
  5. Fold the sides of the pieces of foil upwards to make parcels and put on the fire for 20 – 30 minutes until done.
  6. Enjoy

Thanks Tanya

The Braai Turtles

This will not really work on a braai, but next time you fire up your man oven* to roast a chicken, perhaps braai a few turtles for the kids.

Who will they love more? Mother that makes them bath or father that gives them this?

  • Handmade beef mince patties.
  • Topped with cheddar cheese.
  • Wrapped in a bacon weave.
  • Add cut viennas as the heads, legs and tail.
  • Bake in Man Oven* for 20 – 30 minutes.

* If you dont know what a Man Oven is, take this link.

Thank you Tobias

Ina Paarman’s Smoke-Braaied Pork Chops (as seen on Top Billing)

Posted by Ina Paarman

Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in loin of pork chops ± 2 cm thick trimmed of excess fat
  • Ina Paarman’s Braai & Grill Seasoning
  • olive oil
  • Ina Paarman’s Sticky Marinade
  • a very big bunch of fresh rosemary and/or sage
  • Ina Paarman’s Ready to Serve Mustard Sauce

Method

Imagine juicy glazed pork chops infused with deep smoky flavour. All within easy reach with this unique method.

STEP-BY-STEP METHOD

1. Cut 2 slits 3 cm apart through the fat layer to prevent curl-up when cooking. Season both sides of the chops with braai & grill seasoning and drizzle with olive oil. Pat the seasoning and oil into the meat. Leave chops at room temperature for 30 minutes while preparing medium hot coals. Clean the grid.

2. Lift the grid and place a small pan in the middle of the braai, directly on the coals, to create a coal free zone. (I prefer to do this rather than raking the coals to the sides) Stand the chops fat side up in a special little smoke rack or in doggy bone shaped cookie cutters. The bones below will buffer the meat from excessive heat. Place the rack on the grid.

3. Smoke the chops for 7-9 minutes. Open the lid. Remove the smoke rack. Lift the grid and remove the pan from the coals. Replace the grid and lay the chops down flat on the grid. Baste the chops with Sticky Marinade. Turn and baste regularly until done. Finally give it a generous glaze of marinade before serving. Serve with mustard sauce, garlic bread and a well dressed Greek salad. (serves 6)

Jordie’s pig ribbertjies

Posted by Chris Jordan

Ingredients

  • Enough for 8 people
  • 5 kg pig ribs, fresh, uncooked and with the skin intact
  • Nomu Pork Seasoning
  • Good quality honey, about 1 litre

Method

  • Sprinkle the Nomu Pork Seasoning liberally the night before and leave in fridge – do not freeze.
  • Allow three hours before the last stretch which will be another 30 minutes.
  • Stoke a Weber big time, indirect with good quality charcoal.Leave to burn through for about 20 minutes.
  • Place a drip tray at the bottom and on the grid, pack the ribbertjies with the skin on the outside, almost tent shaped.
  • Place the lid on and LEAVE for 3 hours.
  • Now, cut the skin, which ought to be crispy from the ribbertjies and cut the ribbertjies in individual pieces. Place in a large pan and squirt the honey liberally over the ribbertjies.
  • Place back in Weber and make sure the heat is still OK, if not, stoke the fire brother.
  • ave three more beers and take out.
  • Serve immediately with a moerse groot salad

Mielies with a Bacon Twist

Posted by Craig from Durban

Ingredients

4 Sweet Mielies with their leaves on
2 Packets streaky bacon

Method

Open up your mielies
Soak the mielies in a bucket of water for half an hour.
Take out the mielie and open up the leaves.
Take a piece of streaky bacon and stretch with the back of a knife.
Then take the stretched bacon and wrap around the Mielie.
Wrap as many pieces of bacon as you want.
Close the leaves and toss on the braai for about 20-30 minutes
Take off the braai.
Open up

The fat and flavour from the bacon flavours the mielei. Enjoy.

Basting for Spare ribs

Posted by Alpha Braaier

Ingredients

80 ml Honey
60 ml Soy sauce
45 ml Oyster sauce
30 ml Soft brown sugar
7 cm Piece ginger grated
3 Cloves garlic crushed
15 ml Tomato paste
1 ml Salt
1 ml Cayenne pepper
1 ml Ground cinnamon
Chopped parsley

Spare Ribs. What women are made of.

Method

Mix all together and baste ribs as you braai. You can marinade the ribs for up to a day beforehand in the sauce, if you wish.

Vark tot Hoender

Posted by Jack

Ingredients

Hierdie marinade kan jy op meer as 1 soort vleis gebruik

  • 125ml tamatie blatjang
  • 125ml worcester sous
  • 1 teelepel knoffel pepper na smaak
  • ‘n knippie Italian herbs
  • 3 teelepels olyf olie
  • 125ml gerasperde uie

    Method

    • Meng alles saam
    • Laat jou vleis oornag in die konkoksie.

    Braaied Pork Spareribs

    Posted by Wynand van Ellewee

    Ingredients

    • 1,5kg pork spareribs, washed and trimmed
    • 125ml soy sauce
    • 25ml honey
    • 15ml sherry
    • 1 clove garlic, crushed

    Spare Ribs. Adam also had some.

    Method

      1. Place the spareribs in a shallow baking dish.
      2. Combine the ingredients for the marinade and pour over the ribs. (If you need more marinade, increase all the ingredients).
      3. Marinate for 2 hours, turning once.
      4. Drain, reserving the marinade.
      5. Braai the spareribs over moderate coals for about 25-30 minutes, turning and basting often with marinade.
      6. When they are 80% done, you can (but dont have to) cut them and throw them back with the remaining marinade and toss them around in the bowl. Return to grid and finish the braai. The sauce will then also cover their exposed sides, as shown on the photo.

        Vlakken Vlakvark

        Posted by Emile

        Ingredients

        Kry nou die dag ‘n vlakvarkrib. Dit lyk heel skaflik, maar om dit sag te kry vir braai is ‘n ander storie. Ek kry hierdie resep toe by Fieta Obberammastra van Namibië.

        • Water
        • Lourierblare
        • Peper korrels
        • Tamatiesous
        • Worcestersous
        • Aromat of Tabasco

        Method

        • Maak ‘n swartpot vol water. Laat die water kook, soos in borrelend.
        • Gooi twee lourierblare en ‘n handvol peperkorrels in die water.
        • Plaas dan die vlakvarkrib in die pot.
        • Kook die rib vir 13 ure in die water. (Nie net om dit sag te kry nie, maar ook om die geur van nat-hond en meerkatpie uit die rib te dryf.)
        • Haal die rib uit en laat dit afkoel. Smeer met tamatiesous, aromat, Mrs Balls, Tabasco..enigiets geurigs en braai die rib oor kole.
        • Die beste wenk is egter om nie die vlakvark met jou kar te tref nie. Sodoende spaar jy die gedwonge kennismaak met die rib.

        Spek & Shrooms

        Posted by Anton

        Ingredients

        • 1 Punnet of button mushrooms
        • 1 Packet of bacon
        • A bottel of your favourite BBQ, Monkeygland or Marinade sauce

        Method

        • Wrap a piece of bacon around a mushroom and secure with a toothpick.
        • Put wrapped mushrooms in a bowl until bottom layer is covered.
        • Gooi some of your sousies over until well covered.
        • Prepare as many as you see fit for the guests
        • Put on braai until bacon is done turning regularly to stop sauce from blackening.
        • Serve as snaks before the main meal or as a side dish to the main meal.
        • Warning: 1 per guest is not enough.

        Garlicporkgalore

        Posted by Amanda Roux

        Ingredients

        • 6 pork fillets
        • 12 garlic heads assorted herbs (own choice)
        • Soft butter
        • Dash of red wine Salt/pepper
        • Olive oil

        Method

        • Spread the fillets open on a working area.
        • Spice with salt pepper and olive oil.
        • Crush the inside parts of the garlic heads till fine and mushy.
        • Crush herbs fine and mix with the soft butter.
        • Add the herb and butter mixture to the garlic.
        • Place some of the mixture into each pork fillet and roll each one up and secure with a tooth pick.
        • Pour some selected red wine into a dish and place the meat in the dish for +- a half an hour.
        • Take out of the dish and braai over a mild fire till butter has melted and the meat is juicy and tender.
        • Enjoy with patatoe salad, green salad and breadrolls.
        • Mzanzi 4 sjo!!!!

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